Saturday, January 30, 2016

Fancy Kitchen Essentials- Reusable Sponges (Full Tutorial)

Who's ready to make your kitchen fancy? Want to brighten up your sink? Well grab your fabric and let's get to it with the reusable sponge tutorial!


To make your own reusable sponge you will need:



1- fat quarter of quilters cotton
1- fat quarter or terry cloth, bamboo terry, or wash cloth
1 square of 1 inch thick all purpose foam

*I would suggest Nufoam or something similar as your core. You want to make sure that whatever foam/sponge you pick is mildew resistant. These sponges are not antibacterial or antimicrobial. Make sure when purchasing your foam that you look at the washing instructions. You want foam that you can machine wash. These sponges are just like your regular kitchen washcloths, you will still need to wash them on a regular basis. Nufoam is available in squares that are 1 inch thick at fabric or craft stores. You'll find it by batting and pillow stuffing*

*If you're using washcloth as your backing material, do some shopping around.  I went to Ross and was able to find Ralph Lauren set of 8 for a really good price!*


Start by cutting your front cotton piece and back cloth piece. You will cut each 5.5" x 4"




Next you're going to cut your foam! You need a 4" x 3" piece of foam. I use a ball point pen to mark my cut lines.


Use a pair of regular scissors(not your sewing scissors) and cut along the lines on your foam. It seems like it would be hard, but I promise it's not!


 If your foam piece is not perfectly straight don't worry, it'll still work!



Next you're going to assemble your sponge casing! Start by putting your cloth and your cotton woven pieces right sides together.


Pin or clip around the outside to keep your cloth piece from shifting. Make sure to leave yourself a 1.5" opening along the bottom for turning.


Stitch around the outside of your sponge casing using a 1/4" seam allowance, backstitching at the beginning and end to secure your stitches. Make sure to leave yourself that 1.5" turning hole on the bottom.


Clip your threads and your corners and turn your sponge casing right side out through your turning hole.


Poke out your corners and your sponge casing should look like this:


Now it's time to stuff in the foam part of your sponge!

Pinch one end of your sponge between your thumb and pointer finger and stuff it into the opening of your casing.


Continue to slowly feed your foam into your sponge casing. Don't worry if it doesn't fit perfectly yet, we're going to fix that in a moment. Just get it all in there for now!



Once your foam piece is pushed all the way in, put your pointer finger into the sponge and push the corners of the foam into the corners of the casing. 



Once you've pushed the corners of your foam into the corners of your sponge casing you should have a small rectangle that fits snug. Fold your raw edges in to close your turning hole.


Pin or clip in place. Stitch across the bottom of your sponge (the end with your turning hole) using a 1/8" seam allowance backstitching at the beginning and end to secure your stitches. This will close your turning hole. Make sure you don't catch your sponge in your stitching.


Clip your threads, and there you have it! Your finished reusable sponge!

Brighten up your kitchen with all sorts of prints. You can match your sponge to your towels, or sneak in a splash of holiday . The combinations are endless!



*Make sure to read and follow the washing instructions on the foam you purchase*

Ready.Set.SEW!

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Lets have a tea party! (Hot Pad - full tutorial)

Who's ready to have a tea party? I know I am!


Today I'm going to share with you how to make your own hot pad! I used it above as my teapot mat! 

To make your own hot pad you will need:

1- 9"x9" square of front fabric
1- 9"x9" square of backing fabric
2-9"x9" squares of insul-brite batting

*I didn't have a 9"x9" piece of my front fabric that I wanted to use, so I cut 4, 1" strips that I sewed along all 4 sides to make my front square 9"x9" - this is why my front piece has a black border along the outside.*

*Insul-brite batting is a breathable material which reflects hot or cold temperatures back towards it's source. It's used in the center of the hot pad to keep heat from moving through. Insul-brite is heat *resistant* it is NOT heat proof so use it carefully and make sure to test before using it to pull out hot pans. Insul-brite can often be found in the interfacing, or in the utility fabrics section. If you can't find it ask at the cutting counter and they should be able to help!*


Start by making a hot pad sandwich! You're going to layer your materials starting with both layers of insul-brite, top fabric *right side up*, bottom fabric *right side down*


Pin or clip around your hot pad to keep all the layers in place, leaving a 1.5" opening on the bottom for turning.


Now we're going to stitch around our hot pad to secure all the layers. I would suggest stitching one side at a time to keep your fabrics from shifting. Use a 1/4" seam allowance and sew around all the sides, backstitching at the beginning and end to secure your stitching. Make sure you leave yourself the 1.5" turning hole on the bottom.


Clip your threads and your corners (just slightly make sure you don't clip your stitches), and turn your hot pad right side out through your turning hole. Using a chopstick or a turning tool poke out all 4 of your corners.


Turn your raw edges towards the inside and pin or clip in place.


Top stitch around the outside of your pad using a 1/8" seam allowance, making sure to catch your turning hole layers.


Clip your threads and your hot pad is finished!


Follow the post from last week on how to make your own coasters and you'll have an entire tea party set!



Ready.Set.Sew!

Friday, January 22, 2016

1,000 View Birthday!


Wow! The blog has reached it's first 1,000 views! Thank you so much to everyone who has come to the blog to see the tutorials and reviews!



I appreciate all of the support and love I've gotten from everyone as I've started sharing my sewing journey. There's a ton of fun planned for the coming months so I hope you will continue to check back!


Much Love! -Jacky


Ready.Set.SEW!


Water Proof, Heat *Resistant*, Coasters (Full Tutorial)

Is everybody ready for some fun? What I'm about to share with you is sure to make your creative wheels start turning!

If you've been waiting to do your first fussy cut project, I have the perfect one to start with!

Coasters!



To make your own coasters you will need:

a fat quarter of quilting cotton
a fat quarter of coordinating PUL
1/4 yard of insul-brite batting

*Insul-brite batting is a breathable material which reflects hot or cold temperatures back towards it's source. It's used in the center of these coasters to prevent hot drinks (like coffee or tea) from melting your PUL. Insul-brite is heat *resistant* it is NOT heat proof so use it carefully and make sure you don't place scalding hot cups on your coasters. Insul-brite can often be found in the interfacing, or in the utility fabrics section. If you can't find it ask at the cutting counter and they should be able to help!

PUL (Polyurethane Fabric) is a print fabric laminated with polyurethane water proofing on one side. One of the popular brands you may be able to find at your local fabric store is Babyville.*

You're going to start by cutting your fabrics. If you have a fun fabric that has a print that you'd like to showcase this may be a great project for it! You will need to cut 4.5" x 4.5" squares for your front piece.

I decided to fussy cut some Villains fabric!




Cut 4.5" x 4.5" squares of all 3 materials. For each coaster you will need one layer of cotton woven (front), one layer of insul-brite batting (middle) and one layer of PUL (backing).



Once you have cut your fabrics you're going to make some coaster sandwiches!

Your layers will be as follows:

Insul-brite

Front fabric *right side up*

PUL *right side down*


Clip, or pin, all 4 sides of your coaster, repeat the layering and clipping on all of your coasters.



Now we're going to stitch these cuties together! Stitch down one side of your coaster using a 1/4" seam allowance.

*Tip: when using PUL it tends to shift. Use a ballpoint needle and teflon foot on your machine to help. Stitch down one side of your coaster, take it off the machine and flatten out the layers and clip down the two perpendicular sides from the seam you just made. This will keep your PUL from shifting. Now you will stitch down the parallel side (here's a picture to help explain!)


Stitch down one of your clipped sides using a 1/4" seam allowance, then on the opposite side you will stitch down the side leaving a 1.5" opening in the middle of the seam, to turn your coaster. 


Clip your corners and turn your coaster right side out.


Make sure to use a turning tool or a chop stick to poke out your corners. 


Fold your raw edges towards the inside and clip your turning hole closed. 


Stitch around the outside of your coaster using a 1/8" seam allowance, making sure to catch your turned edges in your top stitch.


Clip your threads and there you have it! Your finished coaster! 



Repeat all the steps with the remaining coasters and you'll have a whole set!

I think it's time for a tea party!


Ready.Set.SEW!








Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Swoon Patterns Bonnie Bucket (Review)

Calling all bag lovers! 

Check this out:

Vintage sewing machines and black contrast from Joann Fabrics

This is the Bonnie Bucket Bag by Swoon Patterns.

I just have to say it, I LOVE THIS BAG!

Squirrels, vintage sewing machines, and black contrast from Joann fabrics

The Bonnie is a fantastic first time, bag maker pattern. With easy to follow directions and photo tutorial steps you'll have pretty purses in no time! All of Swoon Patterns are available as PDF downloads, which means as soon as you purchase the pattern you can print and start sewing!

Bonnie's are perfect as a purse, diaper bag, library bag, knitting bag, basically a whatever you need it for - bag!

Dr Who Galaxy and blue plaid from Craft Warehouse

The Bonnie features two panels on each side which leaves you space to showcase  prints (especially if you enjoy fussy cutting!).

You can customize the length of your strap and your Bonnie can become cross body style!


Personally, my favorite thing to do with the Bonnie is add glitter vinyl or glitter canvas. Both materials can seem a little intimidating to work with your first go around, but I promise after you've used glitter once - you will use it again!

Red Marine Glittery Vinyl from Mill End Fabrics, Haunted Trees from Joann Fabrics

Wild Rumpus Panel from Sugar Ink Custom Fabrics, Black Glitter Canvas from Mikriworld

The Bonnie pattern includes a welt pocket on the outside (which I haven't used on mine). You can easily add pockets to the inside of your Bonnie if you'd like. I always add at least one elastic topped pocket, if not more. This gives me, and my customers, spots for their phones or keys. 

The Bonnie also features a recessed zipper closure on the top which leaves you with a nice clean, finished edge.


I like to add one more touch of personalization by making the bottom of my lining match the outside of my bags.



 Jump over to Swoon and grab your Bonnie now and you'll have your first custom bag made in no time!


Ready.Set.SEW!